Southern Region

Earnings in 18 South East authorities still below 2007 levelShare on Twitter Share on Facebook

Posted: 06 Jul 2017

The real value of earnings for all full-time employees resident in the South East has dropped by 12.8% between April 2007 and April 2016 a new GMB Southern Region analysis of the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings shows.

18 out of the 19 areas in the South East still have a lot of ground to make up on earnings levels before the recession.

For full time employees resident in Surrey the drop has been 22.7%, in Bracknell Forest the drop is 18.3%, in Kent 16.7%, on the Isle of Wight 14.5% and in West Sussex 13%.

Set out in the table below are the 2007 and 2016 mean annual earnings figures for 19 counties and unitary authorities where data are available with the actual change figures and the change figures taking into account inflation of 27.3%.

The tables have been compiled by GMB Southern region, see notes to editors for sources and definitions.

    2007 Mean 2016 Mean change % change (07-16) % change after inflation (2007-16) 27.26%
  South East 34,514 38,286 3,772 10.9 -12.8
1 Surrey 45,913 45,174 -739 -1.6 -22.7
2 Bracknell Forest UA 36,723 38,172 1,449 3.9 -18.3
3 Kent 33,391 35,405 2,014 6 -16.7
4 Isle of Wight UA 26,071 28,373 2,302 8.8 -14.5
5 West Sussex 32,108 35,533 3,425 10.7 -13
6 Southampton UA 25,725 28,735 3,010 11.7 -12.2
7 Milton Keynes UA 31,624 35,366 3,742 11.8 -12.1
8 East Sussex 29,375 32,979 3,604 12.3 -11.8
9 Portsmouth UA 25,577 29,013 3,436 13.4 -10.9
10 Oxfordshire 33,943 39,120 5,177 15.3 -9.4
11 Buckinghamshire 39,732 45,859 6,127 15.4 -9.3
12 Reading UA 31,464 36,496 5,032 16 -8.9
13 Medway UA 27,719 32,172 4,453 16.1 -8.8
14 Hampshire 32,205 37,876 5,671 17.6 -7.6
15 West Berkshire UA 35,582 42,072 6,490 18.2 -7.1
16 Slough UA 26,938 31,981 5,043 18.7 -6.7
17 Wokingham UA 40,066 47,725 7,659 19.1 -6.4
18 Brighton and Hove UA 30,481 37,207 6,726 22.1 -4.1
19 Windsor and Maidenhead UA 44,027 58,534 14,507 33 4.5

Paul Maloney, GMB Southern Regional Secretary, said “The real value of earnings for all full-time employees resident in the South East has dropped by 12.8% between April 2007 and April 2016.

“There are still 18 areas in the South East where earnings are below the level of 2007 once inflation has been taken into account.

“We need several years of growth to fill the gap and to meet the ever rising cost of housing.

“The recession and inflation are not the only causes of the decline in the value of earnings in the private sector especially for lower paid manual workers. Capital’s share of annual national income has increased by nearly 50% in a generation while the share going to wages has declined.

“Employers threats and actions, like the recent sacking of shop stewards at Cineworld in London in the course of strike action on pay, is curtailing the rights of workers to join trades unions and to seek collective bargaining agreement to resist and reverse this transfer of income from labour to capital.

“This hostility is widespread and enjoys effective impunity. In Amazon trades union organisation is underground like the French resistance as is the case elsewhere. It is a major cause of growing inequality in the UK.

“So employers hostility is not only abusing the human rights of workers to join trades unions to hold down pay in favour of profits but it now also threatens consumer spending and increases the risk of a further recession.

“Last month the GMB Congress called for hostile action by employers against workers wanting to join unions to be made a criminal offence punishable by punitive fines and prison sentences. The current position where employers can violate the human rights of workers to join trades unions and to seek collective bargaining with impunity can no longer be tolerated.

“This impunity for employers hostility in the private sector is maybe more important than the pay cap in the public sector in holding down pay in the private sector.

“GMB will mobilise to support a national roadshow for the sacked shop stewards at Cineworld in Brixton being used to win support for their pay dispute and to highlight the need for legislation to deal with the current effective impunity employers enjoy in denying workers rights by aggressive hostile actions.

“So as well as lifting the pay cap in the public sector action is also needed in the private sector to secure decent pay rises.

“This will require legislation to deal with the current effective impunity employers enjoy in denying workers rights to join unions to end the silencing and oppression of the manual  working class in the UK.

“All workers should be looking for decent pay rises in both the public and private sectors.

“So as well as Parliament acting on the pay cap in the public sector it has a key role to play in liberating the UK working class to fight for their fair share of national income now going to capital.

“Workers are not looking for charity but for effective enforcement of the human rights they have but which are denied by employers with impunity. This should be one of the lessons the employers should draw from the results when the electorate was asked to vote in recent nationwide polls. ”

Contact: Paul Maloney on 07801 343839

Notes to Editors:

1) Source: 2007-2016 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings – residence based for all employee jobs. Table 8.7a, Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics. Crown Copyright Reserved.

2) The Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) is based on a 1% random sample of employee jobs (approximately 181,000 employees) taken from HM Revenue and Customs PAYE records. Information on earnings and hours is obtained from employers and treated confidentially. It covers all employee jobs in all industries and occupations across the whole of the United Kingdom. In 2016 information related to the pay period which included 13 April.

3) ASHE analyses for annual earnings relate to employees on adult rates of pay who have been in the same job for more than one year. ASHE does not cover the self-employed or the armed forces nor does it cover employees not paid during the reference period.

4) Further details are available here